Autism & Development Disorders Inpatient Research Collaborative (ADDIRC)

The goal is to develop a comprehensive registry of clinical and biological data on severely affected children and adolescents with autism

The Autism & Development Disorders Inpatient Research Collaborative (ADDIRC), founded in 2011, is a collaboration of specialized child psychiatry hospital units, including Bradley Hospital, that serve children and adolescents with autism and developmental disorders.

To learn more about this study please contact Eliza at 401-432-1146 or email RICART@Lifespan.org.

Co-occuring Conditions in Autism REsearch (CCARE)

The CCARE study is recruiting teenagers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to learn more about mental health and ASD.

Teens and caregivers will complete surveys and questionnaires, and teens will complete computer game tasks with their responses and eye movements recorded.  This is not a treatment study.

 

Who can participate?  We are looking for 12 to 17 year old teenagers with autism.

 

What is involved? Participants will attend two visits at The Brown Center for Children, 50 Holden Street, Providence.

Visit 1: Screening visit (2-3 hours).  Completion of psychiatric assessment by the teenager and the parent/caregiver

Visit 2: In-lab computer game tasks (1-2 hours).

 

Contact: Danielle Sipsock, MD at (401) 453-7637 ext. 7 or WHAutism@CareNE.org

 Development of the Theory of Mind Inventory for Adult Self Report (ToMI-Adult-SR)

This study is being conducted to develop a tool to measure “theory of mind” in adults.  Theory of Mind is defined as the ability to recognize and understand thoughts, beliefs, desires, and intentions of other people in order to make sense of their behavior and predict what they are going to do next.

You are being invited to take part in this research study because you are 18 years old or older, and you are fluent in the English language. This study is being conducted by Laura Lewis, Tiffany Hutchins, and Patricia Prelock at the University of Vermont. Center for Children at Women & Infants Hospital and families are reimbursed for their time. 

The Neurocognitive Evaluation Pilot Study

The goal of this study is to test a new, home-based cognitive task for children with ASD.

This study is enrolling children and teenagers (ages 8-17 years old) with ASD. Participants will complete a series of cognitive tasks at Bradley Hospital and complete a portion of these same tasks at home. Participants will be financially compensated for study participation.

To learn more about this study, contact Dr. Brian Kavanaugh at 401-432-1359 or via email at Bkavanaugh@lifespan.org.

Brain Stimulation for Working Memory in Teenagers

The goal of this study is to test whether brain stimulation can improve working memory in teenagers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

This study is enrolling teenagers (ages 13-17 years old) with ADHD. Participants will complete four visits at Bradley and Butler Hospital. Visits will include cognitive tasks, electroencephalogram (EEG) recording, and brain stimulation. Participants will be financially compensated for study participation.

To learn more about this study, contact Dr. Brian Kavanaugh at 401-432-1359 or via email at Bkavanaugh@lifespan.org.

Closed to Enrollment:

RI-CART STUDY

Our goal is to connect as many individuals and families impacted by autism and related neurodevelop-mental disorders with research studies and resources.

Kids and adults are invited to join an ever-growing number of people in Rhode Island and nearby

communities who have already come together to move ahead with autism. Working together, we can achieve our mission of advancing treatment and improving the quality of life for people on the autism spectrum.

To learn more contact us by phone at (401) 432-1200 or by email at RICART@Lifespan.org

Physiological Responses and Observations

The goal of this project is to learn more about how the minds and bodies of adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) react to their social environment. 

The PRO study is open to 18-25 year old adults with autism or typically developing adults. Participants

 will have their physiology(heart and nervous system responses)recorded non-invasively during a lab visit and some participants may be given equipment to take home and wear overnight. 

To learn more contact Hasmik Tokadjian by phone at 401-453-7637 or by email at WHAutism@carene.org

The PHOEBE Study—Physiology of Emotion, Behavior, and Engagement 

A goal of the PHOEBE study is to develop measurement techniques used to improve diagnosis and prediction of functional outcomes

The PHOEBE study is enrolling children ages 2-6 with autism, as well as children with typical development and children with other forms of development delay. Participating in the study involves 2 visits to the Brown Center for Children at Women & Infants Hospital and families are reimbursed for their time. 

To learn more contact Hasmik Tokadjian by phone at 401-453-7637or by email at WHAutism@carene.org

RI-CART GENETICS SURVEY

We invite you, as members of the RI-CART community, to complete a short survey that will help us understand the barriers, challenges, and opportunities of clinical genetic testing for ASD. 

We would like to get the widest perspective possible and would appreciate knowing from people who are in favor or against genetic testing for ASD, from people who have been tested and those who haven’t, and from people familiar with genetics concepts and those for whom all of this is new information. In appreciation of your prompt participation in this survey we will provide you with a $20 or $10 gift card. Thank you for your partnership in helping the ASD community! 

If you have any questions about our study or want to learn more about any of the areas included here, please don’t hesitateto contact Dr. Daniel Moreno De Luca at (401) 432-1200 or ricart@lifespan.org.

©2019 by Rhode Island Consortium For Autism Research and Treatment

Contact us / Contáctanos ricart@lifespan.org

Tel: (401)432-1200

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